What Makes a Farmer?

Where the famed work/life balance is an aspiration of many business owners, it can be virtually unattainable – and even undesirable – for farmers. “Farming life throughout the world is characterized by the almost inseparable, intimate integration of home, work, memories and family.” [1] More than just a job, farming is the locus of many families; a foundation that informs identity and gives purpose. 

As with anything business related, the financial side of farm succession often eclipses the equally valuable, personal side of the process. If you were to ask Revenue Canada Agency, a farmer is “the person who is assuming all of the risk in a farming operation.”[2] While useful for tax purposes and estate planning, this definition grossly understates what it means to be a farmer.

Agriculture and farming contribute an impressive amount to the Canadian economy – roughly 6-7% or $111.9 billion of gross domestic product (GDP) annually.[3] The economic importance of farming, coupled with the “greying” of farmers as a demographic (globally, not just in Canada), means intergenerational farm succession is increasingly lauded as the key to future agricultural viability.

Much of a farmer’s assets are in the form of physical capital – land, animals, and machinery – which tend to have substantial sentimental value.[4] Some farmers may shy away from transition planning given how emotionally and personally invested they are in their farming identities.

How does one begin to answer questions about what life after farming might look like when it is all life has been? For many, answers to these difficult questions come only after seeking outside help.

Financial advisors who understand farm succession is equally an emotional and financial process can help farmers envision and plan for a life after farming that invokes feelings of comfort, even excitement, and ensure the continued success of the family farm.

If you have questions about your farm succession plan or if you need help making yours, connect with us.

Sources

1, 4 – Whitehead, I., Lobley, M., and Baker, J., 2012. “From generation to generation: drawing the threads together”. Pp. 213-240 in Farm Succession, inheritance and retirement: Challenges for agricultural futures. International Farming Systems Association (IFSA), 2012, pp. 2-16.

2 – Canada, Growing Opportunities, et al. “A Legal Guide to Farm Estate Planning in Manitoba.” Manitoba Agriculture, 202, pp. 1-64.

3 – “An Overview of the Canadian Agriculture and Agri-Food System 2017.” Statistical Overview of the Canadian Fruit Industry 2017 – Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC), 10 Nov. 2017, www.agr.gc.ca/eng/about-us/publications/economic-publications/an-overview-of-the-canadian-agriculture-and-agri-food-system-2017/?id=1510326669269.


[1] IFSA pp. 4

[2] Legal Guide, pp. 4

[3] “Overview of Canadian Agriculture”

4 IFSA pp. 4